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3 principles used in relative dating methods

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The Principle of Superposition tells us that deeper layers of rock are older than shallower layers Relative dating utilizes six fundamental principles to determine the relative age of a formation or event.

For example, the principle of...

This follows due to the fact that sedimentary rock is produced from the gradual accumulation of sediment on the surface. Therefore newer sediment is continually deposited on top of previously deposited or older sediment. In other words, as sediment fills a depositional basins we would expect the upper most surface of the sediment to be parallel to the horizon.

Subsequent layers would follow the same pattern. As sediment weathers and erodes from its source, and as long as it is does not encounter any physical barriers to its movement, the sediment will be deposited in all directions until it thins or fades into a different sediment type. For purposes of relative dating this principle is used to identify faults and erosional 3 principles used in relative dating methods within the rock record.

The principle of cross-cutting states that any geologic feature that crosses other layers or rock must be younger then the material it cuts across.

Using this principle any fault or igneous intrusion must be younger than all material it or layers it crosses. Once a rock is lithified no other material can be incorporated within its internal structure.

In order for any material to be included within in the rock it must have been present at the time the rock was lithified. For example, in order to get a pebble inside an igneous rock it must be incorporated when the igneous rock is still molten-- such as when lava flows over the surface.

Therefore, the piece, or inclusion, must be younger than the material it is included in. Lastly the Principle of Fossil Succession.

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