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How do you paste

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When you cut or copy text and then paste it into your document, do you want the text to look the way it did originally, or do you want it to look like the surrounding text in its new location?

Sometimes you may want one option, but in another situation you may want the other. For example, if you insert a quotation from a Web page into your document, you may want How do you paste quotation to appear exactly How do you paste it does on the Web page. On the other hand, if you copy text from one of your own documents to another, you may prefer that the copied text look like the text in the destination document.

In Word, you can choose either of these options each time that you paste text. If you typically want one of the options, you can set it as the default for pasted text. This article explains how. The Paste Options button is turned on by default. If you don't see the button, it might be turned off. Follow these steps to turn it on. In the Cut, copy, and paste section, select the Show Paste Options button when content is pasted check box.

The text that you move or copy can have a font or other kind of formatting applied to it, such as bold or italic, that differs from the document where you are pasting the text. For example, you can move or copy text that is bold, point Times New Roman, and paste it next to text How do you paste is regular, point Calibri.

If you want the pasted text to be in Times New Roman instead of Calibri, you can preserve its look. Click the Paste Options buttonwhich appears after you paste the text.

For procedures, go to Turn on the Paste Options button. If you paste items from a bulleted or numbered list into a document that contains a bulleted or numbered list, you might not see Keep Source Formatting when you click the Paste Options button.

For more information on pasting lists, see Paste items from a bulleted or numbered list in this article. If you paste a portion of a paragraph from another Word document, and styles such as Normal, Heading 1, and so on are defined differently in each document, the Paste Options button can display Keep Source Formatting as selected, yet the pasted text will not look like the text in the original document.

This is because the format of the text in the original document is governed by its paragraph style. "How do you paste" you want to preserve its original formatting, do the following:. The text that you move or copy can have a font or other kind of formatting applied to it such as bold or italic that differs from the document where you are pasting the text. If you want the pasted text to be in Calibri How do you paste match the surrounding text, follow these steps.

If the text that you are pasting includes portions of formatting that you want to preserve, such as bold or italicized words, click Match Destination Formatting. If you want to remove all of the original formatting from the text that you are pasting, click Keep Text Only. Note that if your How do you paste includes content that How do you paste not text, the Keep Text Only option discards the content or converts it to text.

For example, if you use the Keep Text Only option when you paste content that includes pictures and a table, the pictures are omitted from the pasted content, and the table is converted to a series of paragraphs. The Keep Text Only option may discard the bullets or numbering, depending on the default setting for pasting text in Word. To preserve the bullet and number characters, you can convert the bulleted or numbered list formatting to paragraphs that begin with bullet or number characters.

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Select the Keep bullets and numbers when pasting text with Keep Text Only option check box. If you paste items from a bulleted or numbered list into a document that contains a bulleted or numbered list, you can paste the items as part of an How do you paste list and continue the numbering sequence, or you can paste the items as a new list. I want to paste numbered items in a numbered list so that the items I paste are numbered separately from the surrounding list.

For example, if you want the items that you paste to be numberedas subitems of number 2 in an existing list, do the following:. If you are pasting from one list to another in the same document and you use the Paste List Without Merging command, you may need to restart the numbering of one of your lists.

To restart numbering, right-click the item that you want to be first, and then click Restart at 1 on the shortcut menu. Select the numbered items that you pasted, and then, in the Paragraph group on the Home tab, click Increase Indent.

If you want the bulleted items to be converted to numbered items in the list, click Merge With Existing List. If you want the bulleted items to be a bulleted list within the numbered list, click Paste List Without Merging.

I want to paste bulleted items so that they create a bulleted list as part of an How do you paste in a numbered list. For example, if you want the items that you paste to be bulleted subitems of number 2 in an existing list, do the following:.

If you need to indent the bulleted items that you pasted, select the items, and then in the Paragraph group on the Home tab, click Increase Indent. If you want the numbered items to be converted to bulleted items in the list, click "How do you paste" With Existing List. If you want the numbered items to be a numbered list within the bulleted list, click Paste List Without Merging.

I want to paste numbered items in a bulleted list so that they create a numbered list as part of an item in that bulleted list.

It's such a simple operation,...

For example, if you want the items that you paste to be numbered 1—3, as subitems of a bulleted item in an existing list, do the following:.

Right-click the item that you want to be first in the new list, and then click Restart at 1 on the shortcut menu.

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Select the numbered items that you pasted, and then, in the How do you paste group of the Home tab, click Increase Indent. If you commonly use one paste option, you can configure Word so that it automatically uses that paste option. That way, you don't need to specify which option to use every time that you paste text.

You can override the default behavior whenever you paste text by choosing a different option on the Paste Options menu. Pasting between documents when style definitions conflict. For more information about these options, see Options for pasting within and between documents, and from other programs. To use settings for the smart cut-and-paste option, select the Use smart cut and paste check box, click Settingsand then select How do you paste settings that you want.

For more information, see Set options for smart cut-and-paste. Because formatting can be stored in the style definitions of paragraphs, you can fine-tune the way Word pastes text from various sources. Pasting within the same document. When you paste content into the same document from which you copied the content, you can specify the following default behavior.

Direct formatting includes characteristics such as font size, italics, or other formatting that is not included in the paragraph style.

The text takes on the style characteristics of the paragraph where it is pasted.

The text also takes on any direct formatting or character style properties of text that immediately precedes the cursor when the text is pasted. The text takes on the style characteristics of the paragraph where it is pasted and takes on any direct formatting or character style properties of text that immediately precedes the cursor when the text is "How do you paste." Graphical elements are discarded, and tables are converted to a series of paragraphs.

When you paste content that was copied from another document in Word, you can specify the following default behavior. Any style definition that is associated with the copied text is copied to the destination document. When you paste content that was copied from another document in Word, and the style that is assigned to the copied text is defined differently in the document where the text is being pasted, you can specify the following default behavior.

Direct formatting includes characteristics such as font size, italics, or How do you paste formatting to mimic the style definition of the copied text. For example, you copy Heading 1 text from one document to another.

In one document, Heading 1 is defined as Arial bold, How do you paste, and in the document where you are pasting the text, Heading 1 is defined as Cambria bold, point. When you use the Use Destination Styles option, the pasted text uses Heading 1 style, Cambria bold, point. The text takes on the style definition in the document where the text is being pasted.

Most programs let you use...

Pasting from other programs. When you paste content that was copied from another program, you can specify the following default behavior. The text also takes on any direct formatting characteristics of text that immediately precedes the cursor when the text is pasted.

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