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Straight line backing a tractor trailer

opinion

Log in or Sign up. Please give me advice on straight line backing. Sep 8, 1. England's Trucking School in Indiana in Augustand I failed out of the school due to an ability failure. I only got about six hours of training behind the wheel in my entire time at C.

I'm not ready to give up yet. I'm attending another truck driving school in Alabama right now.

I need help with straight line backing. Most or all of my instructors have over 20 years of experience as commercial truck drivers. I watched all of my instructors perform straight line backing in a tractor-trailer truck with a 53 feet long dry van trailer, and all of my instructors are highly proficient doing straight line backing, yet they all seem to give me different advice.

England my instructors told me to determine and adjust my tractor-trailer to be straight by using the convex mirrors and only look at the trailer wheels not the trailer itself. England my instructors told me to determine if my trailer is drifting to one side by Straight line backing a tractor trailer at the trailer tires in the flat mirror.

At the truck driving school I attend in Alabama, my instructors tell me to determine if my trailer is drifting by looking at my trailer in the flat mirrors. I believe my instructor told me to look at the trailer itself, not the trailer wheels. Then there is another truck driving instructor who told me Straight line backing a tractor trailer look for drift by looking at my trailer wheels in the convex mirror.

To clarify, this instructor is not telling me to look for the alignment of the tractor to the trailer by looking at the trailer wheels in my convex mirror. He is telling me to look for the drift itself by looking in the convex mirror. I've never heard of this technique by anyone, but I've watched my instructor do straight line backing using this technique, and he is a pro.

Trucking Companies should use the...

Everyone is giving me conflicting advice! I don't really like the idea of looking for drift in the convex mirror because I believe that distances are distorted in the convex mirror. Whose advice do you people think I should follow? I'm going to post this first post to make sure it gets posted. Then I'm gonna try to get my next question in within the time limits.

make sure truck and trailer...

I don't want my time to run out before I can post anything. Sep 8, 2. The next thing I want to ask about is how long I must hold the steering wheel to a side to correct for drift. Everything I'm going to post in the paragraphs below pertains to a standard tractor-trailer combination with a 53 feet long trailer.

I've often been told that when doing straight line backing and a driver turns the steering wheel to a side to make a correction for drift, the tractor-trailer must travel 10 feet before the steering wheel turn affects the rear of the trailer. Some people I know seem to think that that means that one must hold the steering wheel to a side for a correction for the time that the semi-truck travels at least 10 feet for the steering wheel turn to make a correction.

I'm not sure if this is true. I will give an example. A driver is doing straight line backing in a tractor-trailer, and the rear of the trailer is drifting to the passenger side. The driver has to turn the steering wheel to the right to get the rear of the trailer away from the right. While backing up, if the driver holds the steering wheel to the right while the tractor-trailer goes back only five feet, and then driver turns the steering wheel so that the front wheels are completely straight, wouldn't that still move the rear of the trailer somewhat away from the passenger side?

Sep 8, Straight line backing a tractor trailer. I just look at the surrounding like use something to align yourself too also you don't have to turn the wheel back and forth all crazy just a little fix and turn it right back to straighten out.

DriveoneSep 8, Sep Straight line backing a tractor trailer, 4. Ok I am not a driving school instructor. I have trained people before.

When backing a semi the...

Either you are confusing what they are saying or I am confused as to how or what you are saying. Having said that I will try and help you with some easy real world tips. The setup is the most important part of backing.

If you don't setup properly you will never hit the hole. Don't be one of those turn the steering wheel hard one way and then have to go just as hard the other way use small corrections unless you have know what you are doing 3.

Don't ever ever ever use the fuel when backing slow and steady is better than an accident.

Backing the Tractor-Trailer in Straight...

Get Out and LOOk. Use every mirror on that truck they are there for a reason. Don't worry so much about the trailer worry where the wheels are going it will show you a path if Straight line backing a tractor trailer look they will telegraph everything 7.

Having state 6 don't forget about the trailer it is 13' 6" high and may get something with 13' 6". While we are on the subject don't be afraid to ask questions. If you don't understand ask.

Here is what I suggest you try next time. Remember your instructors have been doing this for years they can back up in their sleep I am sure, also remember this they aren't on the road for 1 reason or another. WorldofTransportationSep 8, Sep 8, 5. Sep 8, 6. Sep 8, 7. Sep 8, 8. What Straight line backing a tractor trailer found that works for me when backing down 2 rows of cones in a straight line back is to look in the mirrors for some fixed object in the far distance and aim the trailer edge for that item, keeping in mind the cones.

Some instructors will say to hold the bottom of the steering wheel so that if your trailer drifts to the right, you pull the steering wheel to the right.

Sep 8, 9. We had to drive up through the cones, then back straight thru them, so theoretically your set up should be good to start with. Then we Straight line backing a tractor trailer our hand at the top of the steering wheel at the 12 o-clock position. Whichever mirrors you choose, I use mostly the flat ones, as soon as you see your trailer start to stick out more on one side, you turn your wheel toward that side, but only to the 3 o-clock or 9 o-clock position.

Then as soon as it's corrected, move the wheel and your hand back to 12 o-clock. The idea really is, make very small corrections as soon as needed.